Living Without Debt/ Dave Ramsey Free Dating, Singles and Personals

Dave Says: Dating and the Budget

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They end up in my garden, as reminders of a lovely time. Or you can feel sorry for yourself and make excuses and be poor. Kid, I've never lived with a debt. It also helps to use to pay bills online. This is a disgrace. I have no ideas who Dave Ramsey is

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About 6 weeks ago I called them to have my earnings sent to me in the form of a substantial check that was deposited in the bank. All meals out are on it including any fast food meals. We have a mortgage and 2 car loans, but that's only because we don't have hundreds of thousands in cash to pay for a house and cars out right.. I have always lived within my income, not just within my means. Every bill signifies that someone trusted you enough to temporarily loan you some money.

It also helps to use to pay bills online. Carrying a balance is not good, but a small balance once in a while is OK. Just not more than two months. This is just to maintain good credit. Good credit means that if you ever do need a loan, you can get a better interest rate and terms.

I would stick with no more than two cards. Don't cut any extras up or cancel the card unless there is a yearly fee. Pay it off, freeze it in a block of ice in the freezer or some other way of making sure you don't rush to use it on impulse.

Canceling cards also does affect your rating. I live on cash. I give myself 3 payments of cash each week, Monday, Wednesday and Friday. I don't use the ATM. I put some of it in envelopes with specific uses written on them, like "GAS. I pretty much use it the same day anyway, as I grocery shop or run errands on those days also. I have as priorities: Then pay for transportation gas, bus tickets, food, insurance, clothing, and some recreation. Anything needed to generate income is a high priority, in other words, anything required for work, such as tools of my trade, and work-related clothing, training, trade magazines, etc.

Children's needs are a high priority. They get the best quality food we can afford, average clothing compared to others in their group but not too "trendy. But this does not include many things that are luxuries that children often think are necessities except they do get some great stuff from Grandma. We buy videogames used. We get movies at the library or share with friends. However, I don't keep their standard of living significantly lower than mine or higher, for that matter.

I love the feeling of living within my means. It is an honest way to live, and I think, less stressful, than living a lifestyle that is not sustainable. I don't expect the "future me" to support the younger, more immature me. I don't think I will appreciate that down the road. I think that the people that might judge me for my clothes or shoes being a little out of style might also be people that would hate to find out that the person they are dating is loaded with debt and about to go bankrupt.

However, I don't agree with the people who are saving so much for a "rainy day" that they don't live for today much. If you save as much for your retirement as some investors suggest, you might never live well enough to see that era of your life come to pass.

I have decided that I won't live an unhealthy lifestyle unsafe neighborhood, cheap junky food, no recreation or time off, never taking a sick day even when sick, etc. Things cost money to own, did you know that? The more you have the more you have to take care of. Fancy clothes often require dry-cleaning. Nice cars have higher insurance, more expensive repairs, and need a garage and an alarm system.

Collections require storage and insurance. It helps a lot not to have any real addictions. Addictions are by definition, expensive. I don't smoke, drink only occasionally a glass of wine, do drugs, gamble or have any kind of shopping or food addiction.

Addictions are "happiness" on the payment plan--with a very high interest rate! It helps not to feel the need to "collect" a lot of things. I collect quotes, photos, memories and hugs. I guess if you want to collect something, make it something free or small. I like to collect seashells, stones and such from going on walks. They end up in my garden, as reminders of a lovely time.

I collect cuttings sometimes from friend's gardens and houseplants. It helps to know that people who live frugally are helping the environment, by not burdening the earth with more consumerism than is necessary for a quality life. For instance, I buy locally grown produce from our farmer's market weekly, and try to buy things that are in season.

This requires less energy for storage and transportation of food, plus it saves money. I have a little garden that grows some food. No transportation costs there. Reward yourself as your debt goes down with something you really like, such as a hot bubble bath, or your favorite home-cooked meal. Don't be shy about patting yourself on the back.

Take time to appreciate yourself for following through on a commitment you have made to yourself. Own what truly gives you joy and what you will use on a regular basis. The rest will just weigh you down. Do what you are passionate about, and if that makes you wealthy, accept it as appreciation for a job well done. But don't use credit and debt to strangle you as you look handsome singing on the deck of the Titanic. As you recall, the handsomest guy was NOT wearing the fanciest clothes in that movie.

Another money guru is Clark Howard clarkhoward. She says it plain as can be, and takes no prisoners. While her PBS special right now is about women and finance, the advice is great for all of us.

I've also heard about Crown Ministries, another Christian financial program. I don't use it, but I know people who do. I do use credit cards almost exclusively.

But I am highly disciplined and I make money back on them. I pay bills with it, do all shopping with it etc. Most of my groceries are bought in a cash only store, but if I am in one of the other stores for a good sale, I'll put groceries on it even. All meals out are on it including any fast food meals. It's hard to lie to yourself about where the money goes when the statement shows it so clearly. About 6 weeks ago I called them to have my earnings sent to me in the form of a substantial check that was deposited in the bank.

So used properly, a credit card is a good financial tool. If I had to give the card back tomorrow, I'd be fine financially, because I never put anything on it that isn't already budgeted for. I have a credit score of , have waaaayyy too much available credit for most folks, am buying a home that is a stretch for me, but is paying off for me even with all the hype about home prices. Although I don't have as much equity in it as I did a year ago, it's still excellent.

Life is my kind of good but I don't live like Hollywood. And the shocker of all shockers is that because of a bad illness, from which I will never fully recover, I can no longer work. At one point in the early days of being ill, I was what I call elegantly homeless. I owned and owed on 2 homes, but couldn't afford to live in either.

I had an old motorhome that I lived in in parking lots and on streets. What a frightening time. But I came through it very, very strong and with a real testimony of what I can do when I put my mind to it. The common thread running through all of this is that we live within our means, using whatever tools we need to use in order to discipline ourselves.

To me this is the most important aspect of any potential long-term relationship. The idea of being with someone who isn't financially disciplined is foreign.

He can be someone who takes huge business and investment risks as long as the basics are covered. He wouldn't have to live poor, although it's been my experience that some of the richest people I know live quite frugally and simply. And they are so much happier than people who have to constantly fret about money, keeping up with the Jones' and trying to do everything for show, for the image, the Hollywood life. So I have been listening to the radio as I do on a fairly regular basis and I've become extremely interested in Dave Ramsey.

I'm not totally debt free. But it's certainly possible to do so. We have a mortgage and 2 car loans, but that's only because we don't have hundreds of thousands in cash to pay for a house and cars out right..

But other than those bank loans, we ARE debt free. We each have a credit card that have no balances owing that we mostly use for emergencies, hotel reservations and internet shopping things that require a credit card only Our credit cards have the lowest interest rate we could find and they also offer us other benefits air miles and gas money.

Everything that my husband and I buy is "cash on the barrel" paid in cash. A few months ago we bought ourselves a new TV. We saved for 6 months, putting away money when we could and then bought it when we had the full amount. I'll never understand the idea of buying everything on credit? Either your credit cards are almost at thier limits and it could take you 20 years to pay it off by paying the minimum payments, or you have 10 different payments to make a month on items you've bought through payments plans with the store you bought it from.

First off, you never really own it if your constantly making payments on it, and by the time you finally own it, it's either broken or useless. IMO, if you can't afford it, then you shouldn't have it. It's called living beyond your means and we all do it. Instead of making monthly payments on furniture and electronics and credit cards each month, we place the money we'd save into a savings account.

That way if we really wanted something I think you might hve to have some debt for a house, even though Dave Ramsey doesn't advocate it I don't know this Ramsey, but how else does he think a middle-income family is to own a home? I'm able to save money Yea, I've heard of him. Have I attempted it? Yes It was one of his shows that I was listening to about 4 years ago that made me realize that I needed to change the way I using my money. My only debt as of earlier this year is my house mortgage, my utility bills, insurance, and taxes.

I tried to be smart when I bought my house 8 years ago. I found one at far below market value I found a guy who needed to get out because of a nasty divorce , got a really low fixed interest rate, and didn't over buy. At this point I should have it paid off in another 6 years. I have no credit card debt, I used to but I paid the last of it off this year. I have no vehicle loans. I did have 1 vehicle that I was making payments on but decided to sell it off at the beginning of this year and went out and bought another in cash.

I just couldn't stomach making the payments anymore when I was so close to no debts. I can tell you that it will liberate you in ways that you can only imagine! I can finally wake up in the morning and smile knowing that I don't owe a bunch of companies money.

I know that no matter how bad things can get I could make the minimum payment on my house working at a fast food restaurant or pan handling, LOL. The biggest suggestion is what I'm sure you already know If you can't pay for it in cash, you can't afford it. Just start knocking those credit cards and loans off one by one. Start off by paying off the smallest one first. Just so you can get the taste of freedom quicker when you throw it away.

This will really make you start to rethink how you spend your money. Then start knocking them off one by one. You can pay the minimums on some while using the bulk of your money to knock one down faster.

Then when that ones gone, do it to the next. Each time you knock one out you will have more money to knock the next one out. Another thing is be very careful about those credit counseling services.

The ones that say they can lower you credit card bills, etc. Those will trash your credit almost as much as bankruptcy will. That is, if you care about such things. Because in reality, if you live without any debt you have no real use for credit ratings anyway. I never heard of this guy. Living debt free is good, but I don't agree with his method.

I worked in the credit industy pretty much my whole life and the one thing I learned: You don't have to charge anything and pay it off to have a CC for an unforseen emergency. Trust me the CC companies will let you keep it with no balance for "an emergency".

At that point you should already have enough in savings to cover said emergency. By the way, paying your CC off every month in full won't get you great credit. Stop playing their game. Take your financial life back. Its definitely possible,I've never been in debt or used credit cards. I listen to Dave Ramsey every day. Trust me the CC companies will let you keep it with no balance for "an emergency Actually they may not.

It's happened more than once where someone tried to use their card and they find that it's been cancelled for inactivity.

I sell cable for a living, and if you chose not to play their game and don't have a payment history on some kind of debt, it's likely I'll be charging you an extra 50 dollars just to turn your cable on as opposed to the guy who makes a credit card payment of 60 dollars every month. Another and I can buy a house at prime rate. I am totally debt free I've never heard of Dave Ramsey, but I agree with living debt free for the most part.

Yes I have heard of Dave Ramsey Actually it's a great idea in practice. The idea is if you apply his principles, then when that big expense occurs, the money would be there. I live comfortably knowing that this year if I were suddenly struck sick percent of my medical bills would be paid. However I do have health insurance, and all I have to do is make sure I have my deductible liquid. But this is the amazing part. I live confident that if I exhausted all of my deductible this year, on Jan 1 it will be replaced by another I do that by budgeting 10 percent of my gross into a medical savings account.

I recently made the decision to sell my truck and live without. My plan is such that in two years, I'll have roughly 10, to buy a good used car and will be able to make car payments to myself and pay cash every 5 years after that for a new one.

Gallonthemt, you may have never heard of Dave Ramsey, but you hit what he teaches on the nose Luv to Laugh, b e careful. You keep reading Kiyosaki, and Trump, and they may transform your life. Read "Why we want you to be Rich" by Kiyosaki and Trump.

My girlfriends son who is 22 years old, has zero credit, never had or has a credit card, and has never even had a drivers license, rented a place a couple months ago and the only utility he needed to make a deposit on was the electricity.

He didn't need a home phone sense he has a cell phone prepaid. He got a dish system with all the "stuff" multiple rooms, dvr, etc. It would have to be one huge expense. As long as you make yourself an emergency fund you shouldn't have to use credit. How long can I go without a car?

Well actually a pretty long time since all 4 of them would have to break down before I didn't have one to drive and then I'd use my girlfriends car. And the last was one I bought in cash this year after selling my Nissan Titan because I hated the payment. That Titan was the hardest choice though. I had already paid on it for a couple years and it still looked cherry. But I had to make the choice of paying on it a couple more years or sell it and make a little bit really, a little tiny bit , and walk away without any car payments.

I sold it and walked. I am so much happier now that I don't send them any more payments. Yea I admit it, I like vehicles. My parents never paid a dime after highschool. Medical degrees are tough to get, and very valuable when you finish. Same with engineering degrees. I also worked in a car shop with a mechanic who had a physics degree. Both of these people make less than they should if doing something with that degree.

Making money is all about work. If you work hard and you strive to move on, you will. Or you can feel sorry for yourself and make excuses and be poor. See , this is exactly why I think the average college degree isn't worth the paper it's printed on.

No, college degrees are worth quite a bit. It's all in how you use it. If some idiot goes and gets a graphic design degree or something in a town with no market for that and refuses to leave, it's their fault. Not the degree's fault. THey got a degree that will not help them at all just because it "was fun".

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dave ramsey dating service

Either your credit cards are almost at thier limits and it could take you 20 years to pay it off by paying the minimum payments, or you have 10 different payments to make a month on items you've bought through payments plans with the store you bought it from.

dave ramsey dating service

As you recall, the handsomest guy was NOT wearing the fanciest clothes in that movie. I have no vehicle loans. I'm not going anywhere fancy this year.

dave ramsey dating service

Don't cut dave ramsey dating service extras up or cancel dave ramsey dating service card online personal dating sites there is a yearly fee. I don't enjoy worrying about money He is wonderfully inspirational datlng I have since cut one of my two credit cards up after paying it down. Who has several thousand dollars saved up for an emergency medical bill? It's happened more than once where someone tried to use their card and they find that it's been cancelled for inactivity. My bro and I bought a truck a while back we've since sold it together just to have access to a truck and for another back-up vehicle and that worked out great. If you cant afford it you dont need it.